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Somerville author publishes book on Harvard Square

Posted by Marcia Dick  September 4, 2009 10:22 AM

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MoLotmanStandingHorizHR.jpg
Mo Lotman in Harvard Square.


Somerville resident Mo Lotman will be having a launch party for his photo book on the history of Harvard Square, "Harvard Square, An Illustrated History Since 1950," at Passim on Tuesday, Sept. 15th from 7 p.m. to midnight.

Here's more on the book from www.harvardsquarebook.com:

HARVARD SQUARE: An Illustrated History Since 1950 By Mo Lotman With contributions from John Updike, William F. Weld, Bill McKibben, Amanda Palmer, Tom Rush, and Paul Baranay

From the square's tweedy 1950s through the tumultuous '60s, the colorful '70s, and beyond, Mo Lotman gives a decade-by-decade account of its traditions, history, and lore in this stunning visual journey, HARVARD SQUARE: An Illustrated History Since 1950 (Stewart, Tabori and Chang; September 2009; $50.00 US / $64.99 CAN; ISBN: 978-1584797470). The bookstores, the billiard parlors, the barbershops, the booze and burger joints; they're all here. With interviews with more than one hundred of the square's movers and shakers, a treasure trove of archival and modern photographs, and texts by John Updide, Bill McKibben, Governor Bill Weld, and others, Harvard Square brings "the smartest urban space in America" to vivid life. Harvard Square according to John Updike, Harvard graduate in 1954 In 1950 Harvard Square and the nearby business blocks were, to this homesick freshman, a sore--in the dictionary sense of "extreme, very great"--relief from the pressures within the Yard of learning and social adaption....On Sunday mornings I would give myself the treat of sleeping through the bells from Memorial Chapel and then walking in the opposite direction from the Union to the drugstore next to the UT; there I would dip into my modest allowance to the extent of a cup of coffee and a cinnamon doughnut at the counter, whose marble top seemed continuous wit marble countertops at home. The helpful maps in Mo Lotman's priceless assemblage of photographs tell me that this haven from Latin and calculus was called Daley's Pharmacy.
About the Author: Mo Lotman has spent countless hour in Harvard Square since first visiting as a thirteen-year-old. Smitten with the area, he moved to Boston in 1991. Since then, he has been a graphic designer, a writer, a voice talent, and improvisational actor, a musician, and a tour guide, with an interest in local history. He currently lives in Somerville, Massachusettes, with his dog, Comet. Harvard Square is his first book.

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