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Eustis Street Fire House recognized for energy efficiency

Posted by Patrick Rosso  November 25, 2013 12:04 PM

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(Image courtesy Historic Boston, Inc.)


The rehabbed structure on Eustis Street.


The Eustis Street Fire House, the oldest remaining firehouse in Boston, recently earned a LEED Silver certification, which recognizes the structure’s energy efficiency and environmental impact.

Now the headquarters of Historic Boston Inc., a historic property preservation non-profit, the firehouse was designed by Roxbury architect John Roulestone Hall and was constructed in 1859.

The property at 20 Eustis St. served as a firehouse for the Roxbury and Boston communities until 1916, when it was converted into a meeting space for the local chapter of the Spanish American War Veterans, according to Historic Boston, Inc. The veterans used the space until the 1950s and by the 1980s the building, which remained mostly vacant, had fallen into disrepair.

“What we wanted to prove with this project is that historic buildings could be energy efficient and that they can perform well,” explained Kathy Kottaridis, executive director of Historic Boston, Inc.

Historic Boston, Inc., which leases the property from the city of Boston, took control of the structure in 2008. Rehabilitation work at the property was completed in 2011 for an estimated $2.5-million. Work included repairs to the building’s foundation and structure, in addition to the placement of markers that detailed the property’s history and significance. A rear addition was also added to the structure as part of the rehabilitation efforts.

“Often historic buildings are criticized for being inefficient,” said Kottaridis. “We think that it’s important that our buildings contribute to energy savings and that it shows that historic buildings can reach those [LEED] standards.”

To help make sure the structure could perform up to the standards set by the LEED system, the building’s insulation and windows were revamped and the heating and cooling systems were completely reworked. In addition to improvements inside of the building, bike racks and low water usage landscaping were added to the outside of the property, which also contributed to its overall energy efficiency score.

The building was also recognized by the Boston Preservation Alliance in 2012 to read more, click here.

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Email Patrick D. Rosso, patrick.d.rosso@gmail.com. Follow him @PDRosso, or friend him on Facebook.

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