Will 2015 Be the Year of the Selfie Stick?

Tourists at the Eiffel Tower used a selfie stick this week to take a photo.
Tourists at the Eiffel Tower used a selfie stick this week to take a photo.
Remy de la Mauviniere/AP

It was hard to deny the power of the selfie in 2014.

Will 2015 be the year of the selfie stick?

If you are a selfie-taking person, you are going to love this. Introducing the selfie stick, a stick being sold at tourist attractions around the world that takes your selfies to new levels by keeping your arm out of the shot and widening your backdrop.

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All you have to do is place your camera on the stick, hold it up, and snap away. The sticks range from $5 to $50, reports the Associated Press. The cheaper versions will only hold your camera so you’ll need to use a timer to take the shot; the more expensive ones connect to your phone so that you can simply tap a button on the stick to take your photo.

Even if you’re not a selfie-taker, folks are reporting relief over not having to bug passersby to take photos. But naysayers feel the stick is beyond narcisstic, dubbing it a narcissi-stick.

Since the Four Seasons Hotel in Houston is now selling them, we checked in with Four Seasons here in Boston. No selfie sticks there. Have you spotted any selfie sticks around Boston? If so, tell us where.

And check out the places around the globe where selfie sticks have been spotted this year. Would you like a selfie stick?

New York City

A boy (L) wears 2015 glasses as a group of family members use a selfie-stick to photograph themselves during New Year's Eve celebrations in Times Square, New York December 31, 2014. REUTERS/Zoran Milich (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
A group of family members used a selfie stick to photograph themselves during the New Year's Eve celebration in Times Square.
Zoran Milich/Reuters

Japan

Huang Hsin, left, and Lu Yz-che, right, from Taiwan take a photo with selfie stick at the gate of Sensoji temple in Asakusa District in Tokyo Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Selfie sticks have become popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and you can capture a wide view in a selfie without showing your arm. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Huang Hsin, left, and Lu Yz-che, right, from Taiwan took a photo with selfie stick at the gate of Sensoji temple in Asakusa District in Tokyo on Wednesday.
Eugene Hoshiko/AP

United Arab Emirates

In this Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015 photo, Rasul Alekberov holds a selfie stick next to his friend Gudrat Aghayev both tourists from Republic of Azerbaijan while they take a selfie in front of "Burj Khalifa", world's tallest tower in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Selfie sticks have become popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and you can capture a wide view in a selfie without showing your arm. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)
Rasul Alekberov used a selfie stick to take a photo with friend Gudrat Aghayev, both tourists from the Republic of Azerbaijan, in front of the world's tallest tower in Dubai.
Kamran Jebreili/AP

Paris

Tourists use a selfie stick on the Trocadero Square, with the Eiffel Tower in background, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become enormously popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and unlike hand-held selfies, you can capture a wider view without showing your arm. But some people find selfie sticks obnoxious, arguing that they detract from the travel experience. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
Tourists used a selfie stick on the Trocadero Square, with the Eiffel Tower in background, in Paris on Tuesday.
Remy de la Mauviniere/AP
Chris Baker and Jennifer Hinson from Nashville, Tennessee, use a selfie stick in front of the Louvre Pyramide in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become enormously popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and unlike hand-held selfies, you can capture a wider view without showing your arm. But some people find selfie sticks obnoxious, arguing that they detract from the travel experience. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
Chris Baker and Jennifer Hinson from Nashville, Tennessee, used a selfie stick in front of the Louvre in Paris Tuesday.
Remy de la Mauviniere/AP

Las Vegas

Christine Unruh takes a "selfie" with Kelechi Okorie of Nigeria using a selfie stick and a HiSY bluetooth camera remote during the 2015 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
Christine Unruh took a selfie with Kelechi Okorie of Nigeria using a selfie stick and a HiSY bluetooth camera remote during the 2015 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada Tuesday.
Steve Marcus/Reuters

South Korea

South Korean students Kim Gun-ho, left, poses with his friend Lee So-yeon for a selfie using a selfie stick near Seoul City Hall at Seoul Plaza in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and you can capture a wide view in a selfie without showing your arm. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
South Korean students Kim Gun-ho, left, posed with his friend Lee So-yeon for a selfie using a selfie stick near Seoul City Hall at Seoul Plaza in Seoul, South Korea on Tuesday.
Lee Jin-man/AP

India

An Indian tourist uses a selfie stick to take a photograph in front of the historical Red Fort monument in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become popular among tourists because you don�t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and you can capture a wide view in a selfie without showing your arm. (AP Photo /Manish Swarup)
An Indian tourist used a selfie stick to take a photograph in front of the historical Red Fort monument in New Delhi, India on Tuesday.
Manish Swarup/AP

Spain

BARCELONA, SPAIN - DECEMBER 25: Tourists takes a photo with a selfie stick prior to the 105th Barcelona Traditional Christmas Swimming Cup at the Old Harbour of Barcelona on December 25, 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. The Copa Nadal is organised by the Barcelona Swimming Club and involves competitors swimming across some 200 metres of water in the harbour. Launched in 1908 the event has only been suspended three times when the Spanish Civil War interrupted proceedings between 1936 and 1938. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
OK, so this one was technically last year. Tourists took a photo with a selfie stick at the 105th Barcelona Traditional Christmas Swimming Cup at the Old Harbour of Barcelona on December 25 in Barcelona, Spain.
David Ramos/Getty Images