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Honk

Posted by Charles P. Pierce  June 15, 2010 01:36 PM

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Illustrious Friend Of The Blog Mark Feeney sends along an e-mail he got from a friend of a friend in South Africa that explains the deep cultural significance of the vuvuzela to South African sports fans. Folks, if you don't want vuvuzela noise, don't put your tournament in South Africa. (Just as, if you don't want the insane blithering idiocy of modern "game presentation," don't go near an NBA arena.) As one of the foremost advocates for the Vuvuzelation Of Sports, I present this historical explanation in the (admittedly vain) hope that it will remove that big old stick from the hindquarters of American sporting pundits.

"It is difficult to understand this vuvuzela thing as it is an African cultural thing. In the olden days - Shaka's days - we had no other form of entertainment,so for each each and every event there would be beating of drums and trumpets: e.g. if the King wants to call Imbizo (gathering), one of the Indunas (clergyman) will go around the village beating this drum and blowing the trumpet in order to catch attention of everyone (Remember we had no loudspeakers). So everyone knew around the village (Imagine the whole of Soweto) that whenever there was drumbeat, they should gather around at a certain point for whatever announcement was to be made so that they could hear. So whoever got to hear the beating and blowing also had a duty to go and inform each and everyone that there must be something (happening), or (an) announcement -- maybe at the palace - so all should go there.

Even at traditional weddings, church events, school competitions, the only form of entertainment was dancing to the tune of the trumpet and the drumbeats. In our soccer, it spices the vibe. A match without vuvuzela is tantamount to a funeral."

 

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