< Back to front pageText size +

Well played

Posted by Charles P. Pierce  April 7, 2010 07:16 PM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

The Red Sox took a lot of grief -- much of it wholly justified -- for their Opening Night extravaganza that included performances by demon children and the rock 'n roll Undead. But the team did something right last night in the announcement that Tommy Harper would be one of four inductees into the team's Hall of Fame. Harper could qualify on numbers alone. However, and this is the impressive part, the team's press release also mentioned at length the incident in 1984 in which Harper, at considerable personal and professional peril, blew the whistle on the team's inexcusable involvement with a segregated Elks Club at its old Spring Training headquarters in Winter Haven, Florida.

Now the team deserves permanent scorn for still having been involved with the remnants of white supremacist culture 16 years after the death of Dr. King, and the release itself was written in historically neutral language, as though the team's connection to a segregated establishment was something that just sort of happened and nobody noticed until Harper did. Nonetheless, mentioning it at all, much less including it as a key part of Harper's case to be in the Red Sox Hall, bespeaks a certain honesty with the past that is refreshing, given what had gone before.
  • E-mail
  • E-mail this article

    Invalid E-mail address
    Invalid E-mail address

    Sending your article

    Your article has been sent.