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Boston geneticist shares Nobel

Research sheds light on aging of cells, growth of cancers

Jack W. Szostak talked about his seminal findings on chromosomes at Massachusetts General Hospital yesterday. Jack W. Szostak talked about his seminal findings on chromosomes at Massachusetts General Hospital yesterday. (Bill Greene/ Globe Staff)
By Carolyn Y. Johnson
Globe Staff / October 6, 2009

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A Boston scientist was awarded a share of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine yesterday for helping to unravel a fundamental conundrum in genetics - work that began with yeast and an organism found in pond scum but three decades later is having implications for cancer and aging research. (Full article: 942 words)

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