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E.O. Wilson shifts his position on altruism in nature

In his new book, Edward O. Wilson says the widely accepted theory of kin selection doesn't explain the origin of altruism. In his new book, Edward O. Wilson says the widely accepted theory of kin selection doesn't explain the origin of altruism.
By Peter Dizikes
Globe Correspondent / November 10, 2008

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It is a puzzle of evolution: If natural selection dictates that the fittest survive, why do we see altruism in nature? Why do worker bees or ants, for instance, refrain from competing with those around them, but instead search for food or build nests on behalf of their companions? Why do they sacrifice their own reproductive success for the good ... (Full article: 938 words)

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