THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

US saw spread of nuclear arms as 'inevitable'

1975 CIA outlook bleak; progress has been made

In this picture released by the US Army, a mushroom cloud billowed, about one hour after the atomic bomb was detonated above Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. About 140,000 are believed to have died in the blast.
In this picture released by the US Army, a mushroom cloud billowed, about one hour after the atomic bomb was detonated above Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. About 140,000 are believed to have died in the blast. (US Army Photo Via Hiroshima Peace Museum Memorial) US Army Photo Via Hiroshima Peace Museum Memorial
By Bryan Bender
Globe Staff / August 6, 2005

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WASHINGTON -- During his first stint as secretary of defense three decades ago, Donald H. Rumsfeld received a grim intelligence assessment: The spread of atomic weapons is inevitable and there is virtually nothing the United States can do to stop it. (Full article: 1093 words)

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