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Wisconsin facing teacher exodus

Controversial law prompts a spate of retirements

By Scott Bauer
Associated Press / September 1, 2011

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MADISON, Wis. - When students return today for the first day of school across Wisconsin, many familiar faces will be gone, as teachers chose retirement over coming back following the passage of a bill that would have forced them to pay more for benefits and taken away most of their collective bargaining rights.

Documents obtained by the Associated Press under the state’s open records law show that about twice as many public school teachers decided to retire in the first half of this year as in each of the past two full years, part of a mass exit of public employees.

Their departures came after the bill passed but before the new law took effect. The bill, which was pushed by Governor Scott Walker and the Republican Legislature, led to weeks of protests at the Capitol.

The ensuing exodus of teachers and other state employees has spurred fears that the jobs might not be filled and that classroom leadership by veteran teachers will be lost.

Ginny Fleck, a German teacher from Green Bay with 30 years of experience, is among nearly 5,000 teachers who retired.

“It wouldn’t make sense for me to teach one more year and basically lose $8,000,’’ she said. Fleck, 69, decided to retire in February, even before the bill became law, in part because of the hit she would take to her $60,000 annual salary, and because of other changes the district was making.

In the first six months of 2011, overall public employee retirements were double that in all of either 2009 or 2010, according to data provided by the Wisconsin Retirement System. That includes 4,935 Wisconsin school district employees who started receiving retirement benefits, up from 2,527 teacher retirements in all of 2010 and 2,417 in 2009.

Teachers were not the only public employees heading for the exits. State agency retirements were particularly dramatic, nearly tripling from 747 in all of 2010 to 1,966 through June. Retirements from the University of Wisconsin System more than doubled, up from 480 last year to 1,091 this year. All told, 9,933 public workers had retired by the end of June, a 93 percent increase from 5,133 in 2010. The year before, there were 4,876 retirements.

The state Department of Administration said no decision has been made on how many of the government jobs will be filled.

“Each agency is looking at the vacancies created by retirements - case by case - and making decisions based on the needs of the agency, as well as with an eye toward keeping costs down for taxpayers,’’ department spokeswoman Carla Vigue said.

Many public workers feel under attack by the measure, which required them to pay more for their health insurance and pension benefits and took away most of their ability to collectively bargain. Lawmakers pushed the changes as a way for schools and governments to deal with deep cuts necessitated by a state budget shortfall.

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