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@ Odds | Who should be President?

John McCain

By Peter Torkildsen
November 2, 2008
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SENATOR Joe Lieberman said it best: "You know that both of the presidential candidates this year have talked about changing the culture of Washington, about breaking through the partisan gridlock and special interests that are poisoning our politics. But only one of them has actually done it. Only one of them has shown the courage and the capability to rise above the smallness of our politics to get big things done for our country and our people. And that one is John S. McCain."

Senator John McCain and Governor Sarah Palin have demonstrated a record of taking on the establishment and succeeding, and both have the scars to prove it.

Compare the vision of McCain with that of his opponent, Barack Obama, on the economy:

McCain wants to permanently extend the bipartisan tax cuts of 2001 and 2003, realizing that the worst thing you could do during this recession is raise taxes. Obama admits that he wants to raise taxes significantly on hundreds of thousands of small businesses. In fact, Obama, in serving just over one-half of one term in the US Senate, has voted to increase taxes at least 94 times.

McCain believes that the solution to the financial crisis we face is to create economic opportunity for all Americans. Obama said last week that it was a "tragedy" that the Supreme Court didn't pursue "redistribution of wealth" during the civil rights era, and he reaffirmed this misguided economic policy when he told the now-famous Joe the Plumber that he wanted to "spread the wealth around."

McCain in 2003 called for reining in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for their policies that were encouraging and even rewarding unscrupulous lenders like Ameriquest for lending people more money than they could afford to pay back. These policies led directly to the current recession. Obama never once called for these destructive practices to stop. And Obama wants to eliminate the secret-ballot election for workers deciding on whether or not to form a union, while McCain supports the right to a secret ballot.

McCain has often broken with the Republican Party, including when he cosponsored, with liberal Democrat Russ Feingold, the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform law. Sadly, Obama has broken his promise to run his general election campaign with voluntary public financing. Obama's broken promise has set campaign finance reform back greatly, possibly forever.

McCain cares about working families and small businesses. Large businesses in America today are cutting jobs - our hope for creating jobs rests with smaller companies. McCain wants to phase out the unfair alternative minimum tax that hits families and small businesses throughout America. McCain wants to help small companies by cutting the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 25 percent. He wants to allow a first-year deduction of equipment and technology to encourage businesses of all sizes to invest in the future, and create jobs.

The next president will have to deal with a Congress that is bitterly divided and unable to get things done. McCain already has the experience, the record, and results of reaching across the aisle.

These are tough times for our country. We are engaged in two wars. Our economy is in turmoil. One candidate wants to create economic opportunity for all Americans, while the other wants to "spread the wealth around." We need Senator John McCain as our next president.

Peter Torkildsen, a former member of Congress, is chairman of the Massachusetts Republican Party.

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