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Campaign Notebook

N.H. on top as huge primary turnouts set records across the country

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February 7, 2008

WASHINGTON - Voters came out in record numbers in about half the states that have voted in presidential primaries so far, according to an analysis yesterday.

Democratic primaries set records in 12 states: Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, and Utah.

Republican primaries saw their highest voter turnout ever in 11 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Utah.

Combining turnouts in both parties, the highest percentage of eligible voters showing up this year came in New Hampshire - 52 percent.

The report's findings were based on unofficial results from the primaries held through Tuesday. Caucuses and California primary results were excluded.

About 14 million people voted in the Democratic primaries this year compared with the slightly more than 10 million who voted in GOP primaries, the analysis said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Democrats in 2 states pressed to set caucuses
LANSING, Mich. - The Democratic National Committee is pressuring Michigan and Florida to hold Democratic presidential caucuses so the delegates they've lost for holding January primaries could be seated at the national convention, a top Michigan Democrat said yesterday.

DNC member Debbie Dingell said it's unclear whether either state would hold caucuses because they've already held primaries. But she said the DNC is asking the two states to consider such a plan.

DNC spokesman Damien LaVera had no comment. But Michigan's Democratic Party chairman, Mark Brewer, and Florida Democratic Party spokesman Mark Bubriski agreed that the DNC's position isn't new. Bubriski said Florida doesn't intend to hold another election.

The stakes are increasingly high as Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton slog through what's expected to be a protracted fight for the party's nomination. The nominee could wind up being chosen at the August Democratic National Convention in Denver, which makes the question over whether the Michigan and Florida delegates are seated an important strategic point.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

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