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US workers in Mideast find hurdles in local courts

American firms' policies block employees' suits

'They said it is a Dubai company, but that just goes in one ear and out the other. Once it happens to you, realize you have no recourse.' - William Christopher Hyser, (above) who was hired by Virginia-based defense contractor DynCorp but was officially employed by a wholly owned subsidiary set up in Dubai, a business-friendly city-state. "They said it is a Dubai company, but that just goes in one ear and out the other. Once it happens to you, realize you have no recourse." - William Christopher Hyser, (above) who was hired by Virginia-based defense contractor DynCorp but was officially employed by a wholly owned subsidiary set up in Dubai, a business-friendly city-state. (John Blanding/ Globe Staff)
By Farah Stockman
Globe Staff / August 7, 2008

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - When William Christopher Hyser abruptly lost his job as a police trainer in Iraq - and his $16,000 bonus - he was so angry that he wanted to sue DynCorp, the Virginia-based defense contractor that hired him. (Full article: 1612 words)

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