THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Cambridge

Cambridge reaches out to those who can't stop hoarding

City reaching out to those who hoard

City Councilor Henrietta Davis calls the injuries and evictions that can sometimes result from hoarding ''terribly tragic,'' and has asked for a task force of Cambridge agencies to work on the problem. City Councilor Henrietta Davis calls the injuries and evictions that can sometimes result from hoarding ''terribly tragic,'' and has asked for a task force of Cambridge agencies to work on the problem. (Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff)
By Victoria Cheng
Globe Correspondent / November 30, 2008

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Their homes overflow with stacks of newspapers, piles of clothes, or even toilet paper tubes. Hoarders - people who accumulate objects to the point that it interferes with their ability to carry out daily activities - are sometimes trivialized as best suited for assistance from Oprah or the Container Store. But an estimated 15 million Americans suffer from the condition, ... (Full article: 836 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass