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'Let Noah Aldrich . . . lie in peace'

Effort to move graves stirs up trouble in Vt.

Noah Aldrich, who died in 1848, is buried in this cemetery in Hartland, Vt., with two granddaughters. The other stones are presumed to be grave markers of family members. Noah Aldrich, who died in 1848, is buried in this cemetery in Hartland, Vt., with two granddaughters. The other stones are presumed to be grave markers of family members. (Caleb Kenna for The Boston Globe)
By Sarah Schweitzer
Globe Staff / July 18, 2008

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HARTLAND, Vt. - When a former Wall Street analyst from Greenwich, Conn., set his sights on a lush parcel of 150 acres here, he knew he wanted to live atop its highest peak, surrounded by panoramic views and rippling meadows studded with red clover, Vermont's state flower. (Full article: 1230 words)

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