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Verse by verse, poets seek meaning amid the ruins

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina poured through a New Orleans levee in 2005. In her poem 'Everywhere, Water,' Somerville's Georgiana Cohen writes: 'It is not water/anymore; it's a/city's slow bleeding./Levees buckle like/collapsed arteries./The Delta's heart is/broken, and beaten.' The poem was among those chosen for the collection 'Hurricane Blues.' Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina poured through a New Orleans levee in 2005. In her poem "Everywhere, Water," Somerville's Georgiana Cohen writes: "It is not water/anymore; it's a/city's slow bleeding./Levees buckle like/collapsed arteries./The Delta's heart is/broken, and beaten." The poem was among those chosen for the collection "Hurricane Blues." (Associated Press)
By Ellen Steinbaum
Globe Correspondent / January 21, 2007

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I recently spent a week in New Orleans helping to rebuild a house. When I got home and people asked about it, all I could say was, "It's too huge. I don't know how to talk about it. I'll e-mail you something I've written." (Full article: 740 words)

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