THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
‘‘If we want to walk to synagogue or to a friend’s home, the eruv is crucial,’’ said Howard Goldfischer of Minneapolis, who is considering relocating to Sharon with his wife and three children. He took in the view of a backyard of a Sharon home he visited.
‘‘If we want to walk to synagogue or to a friend’s home, the eruv is crucial,’’ said Howard Goldfischer of Minneapolis, who is considering relocating to Sharon with his wife and three children. He took in the view of a backyard of a Sharon home he visited. (Globe Staff Photo / Barry Chin) Globe Staff Photo / Barry Chin

When faith, real estate converge

In Sharon, an eruv boosts house prices

By Sarah Schweitzer
Globe Staff / May 29, 2005

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SHARON -- They are both 1950s-era ranch houses, snug dwellings with three bedrooms, hardwood floors, and each with a fireplace. They are within a block of one another. (Full article: 1295 words)

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