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The It Toy

Hasbro asked its top engineers and marketers to turn a germ of an idea - a life-size, interactive pony - into the one toy every little girl would crave. But overcoming design hurdles and sticker shock were just the first of many challenges the Rhode Island company would face.

Butterscotch
Butterscotch, designed for girls 4 to 8, stops shoppers at a Rhode Island Target. (Photo by Mary Beth Meehan) Photo by Mary Beth Meehan
By Neil Swidey
December 17, 2006

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Early one Saturday morning in August of 2005, Don Fardie hopped into the Jeep Cherokee parked in his driveway in southeastern Massachusetts and began the 26-hour drive to Bentonville, Arkansas. Fardie, a friendly 54-year-old with thick hair, is a manager with 22 years on the job at Hasbro, the world's second-largest toy company. He's the kind of reliable employee entrusted ... (Full article: 4634 words)

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