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SOUL SEARCHING

James Taylor, who turned a life of drugs and depression into lyrics and melodies that connected with millions, carved a niche in pop music that thrives to this day. As he embarks on his latest tour, it's also clear that he has finally found a measure of peace.



By JOAN ANDERMAN
October 1, 2006

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There is a plywood-and-metal contraption, roughly the size of a Mini Cooper, sitting in James Taylor's barn in Lenox. A large cylinder rests in the center of a colossal wooden cube that sprouts an array of pegs, arms, and platforms. It looks like a Rube Goldberg creation or a wacky final project from wood shop. Anyone looking at it for ... (Full article: 4414 words)

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