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All in the Family

Returning soldiers and their spouses, parents, and children are the backbone of the antiwar movement spreading today in the United States. And they're speaking louder than ever.

Gold Star Families for Peace is not a club anybody wants to join: You must have a family member who died while serving in Iraq. Dot Halvorsen, right, of Bennington, Vermont, and her daughter, Brenda (shown at Park Lawn Cemetery in Bennington), are now members.
Gold Star Families for Peace is not a club anybody wants to join: You must have a family member who died while serving in Iraq. Dot Halvorsen, right, of Bennington, Vermont, and her daughter, Brenda (shown at Park Lawn Cemetery in Bennington), are now members. (Photo / Mark Ostow) Photo / Mark Ostow
By Nan Levinson
November 13, 2005

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CARLOS ARREDONDO , a wiry man with expansive gestures, circles the Cambridge Common, handing out copies of letters his son Alexander wrote in January 2003 as he shipped out for his first tour of duty in Iraq. "I feel so lucky to be blessed with the chance to defend my country 6 months after I joined the military," Alexander writes ... (Full article: 3537 words)

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