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COOKING

Grain Gain

Streamlined pilaf methods bring ease and distinction to the side dish.

Dotted with dried fruits and almonds, basmati rice is cooked in a pilaf with chicken stock.
Dotted with dried fruits and almonds, basmati rice is cooked in a pilaf with chicken stock. (Photo / Jim Scherer) Photo / Jim Scherer
By Sheryl Julian and Julie Riven
October 23, 2005

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Traditional rice pilafs (with names like pilav, plov, and pulaw) began with well-washed grains that were then cooked in water. When the liquid had almost evaporated, the rice was steamed for a half-hour longer. The idea was to make every grain separate. In some cultures, pilaf is still made like this. Pots are tinted with saffron, which turns the grains ... (Full article: 1101 words)

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