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A group of local women, meeting here at The Fireplace in Brookline, gather to share stories from the architecture world - including what it's like to work in a traditionally male field.
A group of local women, meeting here at The Fireplace in Brookline, gather to share stories from the architecture world - including what it's like to work in a traditionally male field. (Globe Photo / Jodi Hilton) Globe Photo / Jodi Hilton
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Designing Women

Frank Lloyd Wright was known for flexing his male ego by nailing down the furniture in his clients' projects. Is it any wonder more women architects are branching out on their own?

By Ken Gordon
May 15, 2005

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On a recent evening at the Brookline restaurant The Fireplace, seven local architects and two interior designers, all women, jammed themselves around a table to eat and drink and talk. There was much to discuss, including Julia Morgan, the trailblazing architect who designed Hearst Castle in the early 20th century; the rigors of "archi-torture school"; and the differences between men ... (Full article: 584 words)

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