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The choice

As Democrats struggle to shape a post-9/11 foreign policy, two defining moments in their history, the dawn of the Cold War and the '60s antiwar movement, present stark alternatives -- and reflect a lasting rift within the party

A USABLE PAST? In 1948 (left), Harry Truman won the Democratic presidential nomination as a liberal internationalist. In 1968 the Democrats, divided over Vietnam, emerged with a deep wariness of US intervention abroad.
A USABLE PAST? In 1948 (left), Harry Truman won the Democratic presidential nomination as a liberal internationalist. In 1968 the Democrats, divided over Vietnam, emerged with a deep wariness of US intervention abroad. (Corbis Photos) Corbis Photos
By David Greenberg
May 21, 2006

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EARLIER THIS MONTH, two contenders for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination stood together to stop what they saw as a dangerous drift in their party's stance on national security. At the National Press Club on May 9, Indiana Senator Evan Bayh summoned Democrats to dig in for ''what will in all likelihood be a generation-long struggle against jihadism and radical, ... (Full article: 1960 words)

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