THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Spoils of war

Victors, as Winston Churchill knew, not only write the history, they define the terms of justice. Today, with Saddam Hussein in the dock, the moral complexities of trying war criminals haven't gone away.

Nazi leaders, including Hermann Goering (front row, left, writing), on the third day of the Nuremberg trials.
Nazi leaders, including Hermann Goering (front row, left, writing), on the third day of the Nuremberg trials. (Corbis Photo) Corbis Photo
By Geoffrey Wheatcroft
January 29, 2006

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

ONE REASON Winston Churchill is so endlessly fascinating, and so quotable by both sides in many arguments, is that he was so contradictory. A warrior who loved peace, a man who preached defiance and magnanimity, he could by turns be ferocious and chivalrous. (Full article: 1671 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass