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Mr. Nice Guy

John Roberts is the anti-Bork -- and for Democrats, that’s just the problem

Two extremes, Robert Bork, as right, was cast as the very image of judicial extremism during his failed 1987 confirmation hearings. John G. Roberts Jr. is unlikely to suffer the same fate.
Two extremes, Robert Bork, as right, was cast as the very image of judicial extremism during his failed 1987 confirmation hearings. John G. Roberts Jr. is unlikely to suffer the same fate. (Getty Images (Roberts); AP Photo (Bork)) Getty Images (Roberts); AP Photo (Bork)
By David Greenberg
July 24, 2005

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WHEN PRESIDENT BUSH announced his nomination of Judge G. John Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court last week, Democrats groped for a reason to oppose him. The plain-vanilla, all-American judge - an accomplished lawyer, classically white-bread in looks, one-time high school football captain, reportedly possessed of “Midwest calm” - seemed, in the words of Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut “not ... (Full article: 1320 words)

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