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Ed Siegel

Time stops in its tracks

In 'No Man's Land,' there is a sense of time standing still and moving forward simultaneously -- in a play that's partly aging. In "No Man's Land," there is a sense of time standing still and moving forward simultaneously -- in a play that's partly aging. (David Remedios/American Repertory Theatre)
By Ed Siegel
May 22, 2007

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IT DOESN'T happen often, but when art moves us most, there is a sense of time standing still. Walking around Michelangelo's "David" in Florence we're neither in Renaissance Italy nor in our own 21st-century consciousness, but in some less definable time and space, maybe outside of time and space altogether. (Full article: 783 words)

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