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In one city, at least, two-wheelers welcome

Portland, Ore., model may catch on elsewhere

Bicycling commuters headed downtown over the Hawthorne Bridge in Portland, Ore. Since the 1970s, the city has built about 300 miles of bicycle lanes, and, as a result, has biking rates that are about eight times the national average. Bicycling commuters headed downtown over the Hawthorne Bridge in Portland, Ore. Since the 1970s, the city has built about 300 miles of bicycle lanes, and, as a result, has biking rates that are about eight times the national average. (Dana E. Olsen/ The Oregonian)
By Alan Wirzbicki
Globe Correspondent / August 15, 2009

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PORTLAND, Ore. - Like many other bicyclists who have migrated to this city cited as a national model for innovative transportation policy, Cameron Rogers can relate horror stories from places she lived before - in her case, Boston. (Full article: 1009 words)

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