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How the mighty are falling

Insects and fungi are ravaging oaks in Southeastern Mass., creating a costly cleanup

Oak trees are dying inside the South Eastern Bio-Reserve including the Freetown State Forest. Rodney Demoranville hauls wood from the forest. The trees are being attacked by gypsy moths,tent caterpillars,and winter moths. Oak trees are dying inside the South Eastern Bio-Reserve including the Freetown State Forest. Rodney Demoranville hauls wood from the forest. The trees are being attacked by gypsy moths,tent caterpillars,and winter moths. (Globe Staff Photo / Jonathan Wiggs)
By Christopher Baxter
Globe Correspondent / July 17, 2008

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FREETOWN - Victims of the silent insects that gnawed for years on the state's forests litter the yards and streets of this community, once lush with leafy oaks that are now bare and dead. (Full article: 821 words)

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