THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Quick cake

May 18, 2011

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Makes 1

From her mother’s recipe box comes this quick cake, which Nancy Stutzman renamed. “I always called it broiler cake because after the cake was frosted, my mother set it under the broiler. I loved the caramel and toasted texture of the topping,’’ says Stutzman. This winning confection is simple to make; the flavors are pure nostalgia.

CAKE

Butter (for the pan)
1/2 cup whole milk
1 1/2 tablespoons butter
1 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch of salt
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Butter an 8-inch square cake pan.

2. In a saucepan over medium heat, heat the milk and butter until it bubbles at the edges. Remove from the heat.

3. In a bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt to blend them.

4. In an electric mixer, beat the eggs for 1 minute. Beat in the sugar and vanilla. With the mixer set on its lowest speed, blend in the flour mixture just until combined. The batter will be thick and slightly granular. Add the warm milk mixture and beat until combined.

5. Pour the batter into the pan and smooth the top. Bake the cake for 25 to 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Set on a wire rack while you make the topping.

TOPPING

1/4 cup ( 1/2 stick) butter
6 tablespoons light brown sugar
2 tablespoons heavy cream
1/2 cup coconut flakes
1/2 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped

1. In a saucepan, melt the butter.

2. In a bowl combine the sugar, cream, coconut, and walnuts. Pour in the butter and mix well.

3. Spoon the mixture over the surface of the warm cake. Wait 1 minute. Using an off-set spatula, spread the mixture evenly.

4. Set the broiler on low and place a rack about 12 inches from the element. Broil the cake for 3 minutes, watching the topping so it does not burn. When the topping looks toasty, transfer the cake to a wire rack to cool.

Nancy Stutzman. Adapted from Dorothy Jobson Stepan