'); //-->
Home
Help

Globe 100 Home
  | Index of coverage |

Top Ten
1. Teradyne Inc.
2. Analog Devices Inc.
3. LTX Corp.
4. EMC Corp.
5. Helix Tech. Corp.
6. ACT Manufacturing
7. Millipore Corp.
8. Talbots Inc.
9. Cytyc Corp.
10. FleetBoston

Year's Best
Company of year
Highest Market Value
Fastest Growth
Biggest Stock Gain
Comeback of the Year
Highest Sales

Contents
Overall performance
Banking
Biotech
Growth
  1. ACT Manuf.
  2. Provant Inc.
  3. Analog Devices
  4. Sapient Corp.
  5. Foilmark Inc.
Bulls and Bears
  Bulls
  1. J. Jill Group
  2. Inverness Medical
  3. Reebok Intl.
  4. Bostonfed Bancorp
  5. John Hancock
  Bears
  1. Aztec Tech.
  2. Engage Inc.
  3. CMGI Inc.
  4. Telaxis Comm.
  5. NaviSite Inc.
Employment
IPOs
Profitability
Sales


Charts
* The Globe 100
* Market value 100
* Sales 100
*
Return on equity 100
*
Growth 50
* Highest leveraged
* Top employers
* Most productive
* Industry summary
* Biggest profits
* Biggest losses
* The Bulls
* The Bears
* Top profit margins
* Debt-free companies
* Street's darlings
* Street's wallflowers
* 2000 Mass. IPOs
* Recoveries
* Nose Dives
All the charts for
this year's Globe 100


   | 2000 Globe 100 |

Sections Boston Globe Online: Page One Nation | World Metro | Region Business Sports Living | Arts Editorials


Search the Globe:

Today
Yesterday

The Boston Globe OnlineBoston.com Boston Globe Online / Business / 2001 Globe 100

3. CMGI INC.
Dot-com success unravel quickly

5/22/2001

   

BEARS & BULLS

Old economy companies led Bay State Bulls
The shining lights of the local investment world were companies that sell sneakers, blood tests, clothes for middle-age women, and life insurance.
Continued

THE BULLS
1. J. Jill Group
2. Inverness Medical Tech.
3. Reebok Intl.
4. Bostonfed Bancorp
5. John Hancock Financial


THE BEARS
1. Aztec Tech. Partners
2. Engage Inc.
3. CMGI Inc.
4. Telaxis Communications
5. NaviSite Inc.


Get the chart
* The Bulls
* The Bears
* All the charts


hen the "dot-bombs'' started blowing up last year, CMGI, of Andover, was at ground zero.

CMGI -- in some ways, it's the Net era's answer to the corporate conglomerate fad of the 1960s, with over 60 subsidiaries and investment properties -- saw its shares lose 97.8 percent of their value in the year that ended March 31.

It has since bounced back from its sub-$2 level after shrewd Wall Street investors figured out that the company's $1 billion-plus worth of cash and securities were worth more than the share price.

But CMGI has fallen painfully far from its peak of over $160, when it made its name catching the early wave of dot-com mania, reaping huge profits from its @Ventures unit's investments.

In January, CMGI took a $2 billion write-off for faltering investments. And with the once-manic market for Internet IPOs moribund, investors seem to lack confidence that a company that made its name investing in and spinning out start-ups can successfully adjust to life as an operating company running units such as the NaviSite Web-hosting business, the Internet search engine AltaVista, and Activate, a concern that delivers streaming content.

"We don't know what it is anymore, or what it wants to be when it grows up,'' Steve Frankel, an Internet analyst with the Boston investment bankers Adams, Harkness & Hill, said last month.

PETER J. HOWE

   


Advertisment
Boston Globe Extranet
Extending our newspaper services to the web
© Copyright 2001 Globe Newspaper Company

Return to the home page
of The Globe Online

Click here for advertiser information