THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

A once-great affair stuck in park

After years of spinning their wheels, carmakers are turning to new vehicles to revitalize the declining youth market

Although her father collects Cadillacs, Michelle Gildea said she's happy getting from Point A to Point B in her hand-me-down Camry and more interested in her BlackBerry than cars. Although her father collects Cadillacs, Michelle Gildea said she's happy getting from Point A to Point B in her hand-me-down Camry and more interested in her BlackBerry than cars. (Globe Staff Photo / Jonathan Wiggs)
By Jenn Abelson
Globe Staff / July 12, 2009

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When he was 14, Joe Gildea drove a Chevy up and down his driveway just to feel the thrill of a set of wheels. By the time he was a high school senior, the Quincy native had saved $160 to buy a yellow 1953 Chevy Bel Air with a white hardtop. (Full article: 1021 words)

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