RadioBDC Logo
| Listen Live
THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Innovation economy
Michael Smerka, a clinical prosthetist, puts in battery into a BiOM worn by Rick Knapton, a full-time ankle test specialist. Michael Smerka, a clinical prosthetist, puts in battery into a BiOM worn by Rick Knapton, a full-time ankle test specialist. (Joanne Rathe/Globe Staff)
By Scott Kirsner
Globe Correspondent / June 10, 2012
Text size +
  • E-mail
  • E-mail this article

    Invalid E-mail address
    Invalid E-mail address

    Sending your article

    Your article has been sent.

iWalk is part of a cluster of local companies exploring how new materials, sensors, and increasingly miniaturized technologies can create devices that would restore capabilities that people have lost — or even upgrade ones they were born with. iWalk founder Hugh Herr likes to toss out a mind-bending scenario: If a prosthetic device could help you run longer distances or swing a golf club more powerfully than your own arm or leg, would you consider replacing your flesh-and-bones with titanium-and-silicon?

For more from BostonGlobe.com, sign up or log in below

To continue, please sign up or log in to BostonGlobe.com

Access the full articles and quality reporting of The Boston Globe at BostonGlobe.com

Sign up

Unlimited Access to BostonGlobe.com for 4 weeks for only 99¢.

Are you a Boston Globe home delivery subscriber?

Get FREE access as part of your print subscription.

BostonGlobe.com subscriber

Click to continue reading this article or to log in to BostonGlobe.com.
  • E-mail
  • E-mail this article

    Invalid E-mail address
    Invalid E-mail address

    Sending your article

    Your article has been sent.