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Did you know the US divorce rate has been dropping for 25 years? It's a third lower than in 1981. But the rate in corporate America is rising. Loyalty has 'become a quaint old notion,' and our average time in a job has dropped 6 percent in the past 20 years. Brand loyalty has also plummeted for items seen as commodities, and investors hold stock only a year, down from six not long ago. Chip Conley writes 'the workplace seems to have become a 'rent-a-relationship' kind of world.' True enough. And the currency of the individual has never been higher. Did you know the US divorce rate has been dropping for 25 years? It's a third lower than in 1981. But the rate in corporate America is rising. Loyalty has "become a quaint old notion," and our average time in a job has dropped 6 percent in the past 20 years. Brand loyalty has also plummeted for items seen as commodities, and investors hold stock only a year, down from six not long ago. Chip Conley writes "the workplace seems to have become a 'rent-a-relationship' kind of world." True enough. And the currency of the individual has never been higher. (james f. kraus)

FC expert blogs
Did you know the US divorce rate has been dropping for 25 years? It’s a third lower than in 1981. But the rate in corporate America is rising. Loyalty has ‘‘become a quaint old notion,’’ and our average time in a job has dropped 6 percent in the past 20 years. Brand loyalty has also plummeted for items seen as commodities, and investors hold stock only a year, down from six not long ago. Chip Conley writes ‘‘the workplace seems to have become a ‘rent-a-relationship’ kind of world.’’ True enough. And the currency of the individual has never been higher.

BusinessWeek
Cars divorcing oil
Speaking of divorce, Vijay Vaitheeswaran's new book "Zoom: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future" says cars and oil are "headed for a divorce." Cars need to abandon dirty fuels like gasoline - a disruptive innovation that, like the computing revolution, will probably cause a convergence of the energy and car industries. Look for "a smart, sophisticated, software-rich car" to arrive soon; longer term, watch the line between car plants and power plants blur as these new cars plug into the wall to get electricity from the grid as well as feed it back.

A VC
Skype's bad marriage
Fred Wilson says the failure of Skype comes down to one thing: "wrong guy married wrong gal." Saying that "Skype is a great business that is owned by the wrong company," Wilson says he never saw the synergy between eBay and Skype. "Imagine if Nokia had bought them or even Verizon or even Google." At $2 billion to $3 billion Wilson sees Skype as a bargain and says the right company should grab what could become the "ultimate phone company of the 21st century."

CBC News
Geeks exposed
A recent undercover investigation shows that when you hire a rent-a-geek, you might not get the expert you hope for. It's rather stunning to see how little basic knowledge some geeks have about the problems you're paying them to fix. They may misdiagnose your problem, and overcharge or snag personal data. Investigating national and local repair services, they found that only 3 out of the 10 geeks accurately assessed a problem.

Guy Kawasaki's blog
Grade your site
Guy Kawasaki points us to Website Grader. Go there and type in your site's URL and it tests how effective it is in terms of search engine optimization. Find things like your Google page rank and how your Web-page structure helps or hinders your search results. They also provide advice on things you might want to do and compare how you rate against rivals. Nice!

Ad Age
Viral blockbuster
About a year ago, Dove launched its Real Beauty campaign with a provocative viral video. It has received "more than 12 million views on YouTube alone." Now Dove is furthering its campaign with a new and equally stunning video. The call to action? "Talk to your daughter before the beauty industry does." Now there's a message that's dying to get heard. The company has established the Dove Self-Esteem Fund, aimed at reaching 5 million girls globally with programs by 2010.

Brazen Careerist
Are MBAs obsolete?
An MBA used to mean "prestige and riches," but that seems to be changing. Penelope Trunk says the quality of the degree is compromised by a lack of female applicants. Harvard Business School is so concerned that it "changed the admission process to accommodate the biological clock," meaning students will have less work experience. "If you're not a star performer before B-school, you probably won't be one after you graduate."

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