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Our universe in exabytes

Our universe in exabytes An exabyte is 1 quintillion bytes. In 2006 alone, the human race generated 161 exabytes of digital information. So? Well, that's about 3 million times the information in all the books ever written or the equivalent of 12 stacks of books, each extending more than 93 million miles from Earth to the sun. And, as a study from IDC shows, the forecast for the world's information is partly cloudy, with a 100 percent chance of exponential growth, making information mapping and infrastructure even more crucial. No surprise that Hopkinton- based EMC, the data-storage giant, sponsored the IDC report. (james f. kraus)

IDC
An exabyte is 1 quintillion bytes. In 2006 alone, the human race generated 161 exabytes of digital information. So? Well, that’s about 3 million times the information in all the books ever written or the equivalent of 12 stacks of books, each extending more than 93 million miles from Earth to the sun. And, as a study from IDC shows, the forecast for the world’s information is partly cloudy, with a 100 percent chance of exponential growth, making information mapping and infrastructure even more crucial. No surprise that Hopkinton-based EMC, the data-storage giant, sponsored the IDC report.

The Consumerist

Sales rep confessions


The Consumerist is a blog with the tagline "Shoppers bite back." And lately they have published a rash of confessions by mobile phone sales reps. It started with a former Verizon rep who provided tips on how to game the sales process. Tips like "never get a 2-year contract" and "insurance is a rip-off." Then a current Cingular sales rep 'fessed up, followed by a former Sprint rep. It's a great example of how the Internet and blogs change the balance of power, providing much more incentive to be transparent.

Ars Technica

Major bands, DRM-free


As the digital rights management debate drones on, some companies and bands are going their own way DRM-free. A new deal between Amie Street and Nettwerk -- which reps headliners Barenaked Ladies, Avril Lavigne, Sarah McLachlan, and Paul Van Dyk -- will be a good test to watch. Amie Street is like music stock exchange. The songs increase in price as demand increases. Nettwerk is different because it acts as the management company, publishing company, and record company rolled into one, for a 20 percent cut. The bands own their songs outright. And when you buy their songs from Amie Street, you own the music outright. Sounds right to me.

Innovation Zen

Blogs as resumes


Daniel Scocco says that while blogs won't completely replace resumes, "bloggers certainly have an edge over job seekers that do not publish one." He points out that hiring a blogger is a "lower risk proposition because you have more information and a better idea of how they are going to perform." I just went through a hiring situation in which there were three strong final candidates. One had a blog. The other two did not. We hired the blogger.

Dilbert.blog

Google alerts


Dilbert creator Scott Adams blogs that he just set up Google Alerts, a free service in which Google sends you e-mail any time certain keywords you specify newly appear on the Internet. That way, "any time that 11-year old Vijay sits at his Dad's computer in Lucknow, India, and blogs about his favorite Dilbert comic, Google finds it, and sends that link directly to my left front pocket. I reach in, pull out the Blackberry, click the link, and Vijay's blog opens. I read it, just to see what little Vijay thinks of me today. In India. Minutes ago." And 11-year old Vijay in India gets his blog read by Scott Adams. As Adams says, "How . . . cool is that?"

eMarketer

Where young adults are


Rupert Murdoch thinks MySpace will get to $1 billion in ad revenue all on its own. But eMarketer estimates that $865 million will be spent on social network ads this year. Facebook, a new survey suggests, is the current fav for young adults ages 17-25. Nearly 70 percent of females and 56 percent of males name it as their most favorite site. With young adults spending increasing amounts of time on social networks, turn up the ad dollars.

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