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Powell on Muslim-Americans

Posted by Christopher Shea  October 20, 2008 03:36 PM

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I had heard that Colin Powell had criticized some of the rhetoric coming from McCain supporters (or, rather, McCain's failure to speak out against such attacks-by-proxy):

[I]t is permitted to be said such things as, "Well, you know that Mr. Obama is a Muslim." Well, the correct answer is, he is not a Muslim, he's a Christian. He's always been a Christian. But the really right answer is, what if he is? Is there something wrong with being a Muslim in this country? The answer's no, that's not America. Is there something wrong with some seven-year-old Muslim-American kid believing that he or she could be president?

But until I read this item at The New Republic blog The Plank, by Isaac Chotiner, I hadn't realized that those remarks served as prelude to a longer statement about the role of Muslims in America -- and particularly in the military, the institution closest to Powell's heart:

I feel strongly about this particular point because of a picture I saw in a magazine. It was a photo essay about troops who are serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. And one picture at the tail end of this photo essay was of a mother in Arlington Cemetery, and she had her head on the headstone of her son's grave. And as the picture focused in, you could see the writing on the headstone. And it gave his awards -- Purple Heart, Bronze Star -- showed that he died in Iraq, gave his date of birth, date of death. He was 20 years old. And then, at the very top of the headstone, it didn't have a Christian cross, it didn't have the Star of David, it had crescent and a star of the Islamic faith. And his name was Kareem Rashad Sultan Khan, and he was an American. He was born in New Jersey. He was 14 years old at the time of 9/11, and he waited until he can go serve his country, and he gave his life.

Chotiner identifies the magazine Powell alludes to as the New Yorker, and the photo in question as this one:

muslimsoldier.jpg
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