THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Opinion/Ideas

Pulp Nation

How crime fiction shaped the way we see the world

During the genre's heyday, in the '20s and '30s, pulps sold up to a million copies per issue, and there were dozens of magazines on the racks. During the genre's heyday, in the '20s and '30s, pulps sold up to a million copies per issue, and there were dozens of magazines on the racks.
By Steve Almond
December 9, 2007

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Pulp fiction - the racy tales of crime that captivated Americans between the World Wars - re-entered the cultural lexicon more than a decade ago as the title of a 1994 film by Quentin Tarantino. The film was a celebration of wisecracking killers, casual violence, nostalgic rock music, and, above all, hip irony; now, thanks to Tarantino, the term has ... (Full article: 1444 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass