THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
BUILDING A BETTER TEAM FOR GOVERNING

Business leaders can make a difference without jump to public ector

July 22, 2011

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JOHN SUNUNU argues that President Obama needs more business leaders on his team in order to make government work (“A glut of bureaucrats,’’ Op-ed, July 18). Better government is always welcome; however, the message to business leaders should not be that they take government jobs, but that they re-imagine their own.

What is needed from business is leadership. The modern CEO has enormous potential to make a difference from his or her desk. Identify the biggest problems facing society, develop marketable innovations that can help solve them, and enter dialogue with government and other stakeholders about the role each can best play to bring a shared vision to life.

From car sharing to clean energy and from accountable care to affordable housing, there are clear signs of possibility. What is lacking too often is true collaboration to set a national agenda and deliver results. We know from working with business leaders that there is a hunger to be of use while delivering shareholder value. The time for a new partnership is here, and visionary leaders in both government and business should keep their day jobs.

Andrew Tarsy
Executive director
Progressive Business Leaders Network
Boston

Industry executives, bureaucrats make dangerous bedfellows

JOHN SUNUNU (“A glut of bureaucrats’’) laments that Obama administration bureaucrats are severely lacking in the experience of actually running a business, and seems to feel that the public good would be better served if they had that reservoir of experience to tap into in making policy decisions.

I wonder whether the public good was better served when Bush administration puppet master Dick Cheney colluded with oil industry executives and effectively outsourced regulatory policy to the industry being regulated.

Perhaps Sununu’s preferred model of a bureaucrat hunts with Supreme Court justices and gives CEOs a voice in controlling regulation.

There is a greater threat to the public good when you need a crowbar to pry industry executives and bureaucrats apart.

Jim Cain
North Andover