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Deaf and blind community at risk of losing a lifeline

Bill Greene/Globe Staff Brian Mansur and Jaimi Lard chatted inside an office for the deaf and blind community in Boston. Governor Patrick’s proposed budget eliminates state funding to manage the DeafBlind Community Access Network. Bill Greene/Globe Staff
Brian Mansur and Jaimi Lard chatted inside an office for the deaf and blind community in Boston. Governor Patrick’s proposed budget eliminates state funding to manage the DeafBlind Community Access Network. (Bill Greene/Globe Staff)
March 11, 2011

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COVER YOUR eyes with a tight blindfold, plug your ears, and now, go make breakfast, dress yourself, and go to work — if you are lucky enough to find it.

Welcome to the world of the deaf and blind (“Imperiled state program a lifeline for deaf and blind,’’ Page A1, March 5). You might be a former premature baby grown up, a victim of a severe childhood infection, or a person with a genetic condition. If you have a wealthy family, fabulous health insurance, and siblings supporting you into adult life, you have some comfort. Few do.

Speaking of insurance, we would forgive the former Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts executive who received excessive millions if he would donate $500,000 to save the DeafBlind Community Access Network. The network’s budget is set to be eliminated under the fiscal 2012 state budget. In one philanthropic swoop, the former Blue Cross executive could salvage his reputation and a program.

Dr. Angela E. Lin
Westwood