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Celtics games stir up some sis-boom-bah, humbug

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February 24, 2008

LEAVE IT to book editor Kate Darnton to go where Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart would not, and attempt to define pornography ("Go-go dancing on Red's grave," Op-ed, Feb. 17). Darnton knows it when she sees it, and when she goes to Boston Celtics games, she sees it everywhere - in the "erotic interruptions" and the high kicks of the Celtics Dancers. It's a shame Darnton didn't get a chance to know the dancers. Many are professionally trained, university-educated women. They love to share their talent with the public and support their team at the same time.

We all have our own ideas about what makes a role model, and though I think that young girls could aspire to worse things than doing something they love and contributing to community spirit and charities, Darnton is certainly allowed to disagree. I only wish that, in imagining the Celtics Dancers as either pole dancers or actresses in a movie sex scene, she doesn't continue to objectify them as the tawdry sex salesgirls she wrongly believes them to be.

OREN J. MARGOLIS
Oxford, England

KATE DARNTON put very well what every real Boston Celtics fan feels. I've had season tickets since the year before Larry Bird arrived. When play on the court was stopped, that was a time for marveling at what we'd seen and for guessing strategy for the next quarter. There was no need for an "entertainment venue" at the Garden. Celtics basketball was worth the price of a ticket. That was the legacy of Red Auerbach.

Those season ticket seats were across from Red's, and we became friends. He was against cheerleaders because they cheapen the game and denigrate what he built. The silly hijinks during timeouts and the nonstop noise might be defensible during losing years, but now there's no excuse. Celtics basketball is back.

To real fans, games aren't the place for getting drunk, acrobats, or porn. Especially with Red's name on the floor.

DAN CIAMPA
Boston

I RECENTLY gave up my season tickets. Why? Well, I won't deny that cost was a factor, but an even bigger reason was that I got tired of going home with a headache. Yes, the cheerleaders are silly enough (attractive, but silly), but between the announcer who thinks he's at a carnival, the volume of the so-called music, a flashing sign telling me when to cheer, and the Jumbotron that has the power to sap the intelligence out of otherwise normal people, I decided that watching the games on TV would work out just fine. It's a lot cheaper, the food is better, and no headache.

BOB LITVAK
Worcester

WHO APPOINTED Kate Darnton to head the morality police?

I watched my daughter overcome shyness and a lack of coordination to grow and be able to perform in front of up to 50,000 people. She has traveled the world, learned four languages, and earned a master's degree with high honors. I take offense at the broad brush Darnton has used to smear 21 young women. I've attended Celtics games since 1960, and these performers are not out of place. What is Darnton's next target? The ballet with its formfitting costumes, or the Olympics with their aerodynamic uniforms?

GEORGE HEOS
Boston

IF DARNTON wants to lament that "sex sells," she can begin her protest with the Globe's editors. There were important articles on Sunday's Op-ed page, but which one got previewed on the front page? It was Darnton's deconstruction of the Celtics Dancers. Never mind the editorial about President Bush's retreat on cleaner coal or Joan Vennochi's column on House Speaker Salvatore DiMasi's maneuvers with the state budget.

ILAN MOCHARI
Somerville

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