The City Seen from The Boston Globe
NORTH END -- In an alley between 4 and 8 Battery Street, Peter Baldassari works on his labor of love. Arrayed on the brick walls are thousands of images of saints. Baldassari, 63, says his passion for the saints began in childhood when he accumulated a shoebox of holy cards. Now people come from all over the world to visit All Saints Way and to give him new images. 'Visitors have never seen anything like this,' he says. One of the most recent image he hung was that of Elizabeth Ann Seton, 1774-1821, who started the first American parochial school and who, in 1975, was the first native-born American to be canonized. On the wall along with the saints, Baldassari has posted an old Italian saying: 'Mock all and sundry things, but leave the saints alone.' (Photo and Audio by Suzanne Kreiter, Globe Staff) audio: Peter Baldassari talks about his shrine to the saints <object classid='clsid:02BF25D5-8C17-4B23-BC80-D3488ABDDC6B' width='200' height='30' codebase= 'http://www.apple.com/qtactivex/qtplugin.cab'>
Wall of saints
NORTH END -- In an alley between 4 and 8 Battery Street, Peter Baldassari works on his labor of love. Arrayed on the brick walls are thousands of images of saints. Baldassari, 63, says his passion for the saints began in childhood when he accumulated a shoebox of holy cards. Now people come from all over the world to visit All Saints Way and to give him new images. "Visitors have never seen anything like this," he says. One of the most recent image he hung was that of Elizabeth Ann Seton, 1774-1821, who started the first American parochial school and who, in 1975, was the first native-born American to be canonized. On the wall along with the saints, Baldassari has posted an old Italian saying: "Mock all and sundry things, but leave the saints alone."

(Photo and Audio by Suzanne Kreiter, Globe Staff)

audio: Peter Baldassari talks about his shrine to the saints