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ART REVIEW

Wrestling with apartheid’s legacy

Kentridge’s works are more poetic than political

South African artist William Kentridge at work in “7 Fragments for Georges Méliès.' South African artist William Kentridge at work in “7 Fragments for Georges Méliès." (John Hodgkiss, Courtesy of The Artist)
By Sebastian Smee
Globe Staff / March 14, 2010

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William Kentridge, the South African artist who rose to prominence in the 1990s and who, since 2000, has seemed all but ubiquitous on the international art circuit, makes what many people like to think of as political art. They’re not wrong. But I always think Kentridge’s best work more accurately resembles a tiptoeing yet perfectly honorable retreat from politics. (Full article: 1255 words)

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