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Won't you wear a sweater?

Posted by Courtney Hollands March 11, 2008 12:30 PM

Get to the dry cleaners: Your favorite sweater needs to be pressed and ready for some Mr. Rogers tribute action tomorrow (March 20).

Mr. McFeeley — yes, the mailman extraordinaire himself — is asking people to wear a cardigan, cable knit, or turtleneck to celebrate what would have been Fred Rogers' 80th birthday. Please note: Although the late Mr. Rogers' preferred a zip-up look, you can wear any style that's special to you and still be in solidarity with your neighbors everywhere.

rogerssweater.jpg
[Rogers in a hot red number says relax.]


9 comments so far...
  1. You see that all good men wear sweaters!

    Posted by Marlina March 19, 08 01:27 PM
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  1. My daughter loved you Mr Rogers. She would always say he never yells. When we came back from a camping trip she hugged the TV because you were on and told you how much she missed you. She called me from work the day God took you and she was uncontrollably sobbing. I selfishly thought, I hope she is this upset when I go too. Thank you for your endless hours of teaching my sweet daughter how to enjoy all the important things in life. She sent me this saying she would have her sweater on with a huge smile thinking of her favorite people in her life.

    Posted by Sharon Feltri March 19, 08 02:57 PM
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  1. My daughter Julie and I are forever tied together by Mister Rogers. She is now 26 and vividly remembers Mister Rogers. It's the little things that keep a father and his daughter together.

    Posted by Kenneth Holstrom March 19, 08 04:39 PM
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  1. Two things...when my four year old daughter went to the lake one day, she collected a bag of goose feathers (yuck!). She said she wanted to send them to Mr. Rogers and Mr. McFeeley. At her request I packaged them up and sent them, along with an explanation and then promptly forgot about it. Some time later came a BEAUTIFUL letter from Mr. Rogers thanking her and reminding her that there was no one like her and that she was special...just the way she was. We have the letter still, The second, my husband would often come home from work and we would find ourselves in the living room talking about our days where our daughters, numbering three, would be watching Mr. Rogers. Many times we would find ourselves wiht our conversation ceased and our attentions rapt in the magic of one of the worlds most magnificent and most significant heroes.

    Posted by Jill Bauer March 19, 08 07:00 PM
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  1. If you are a fan of Mr. Rogers than you will like this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob9ghdXq-JU

    Posted by Michael Sullivan March 20, 08 06:38 AM
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  1. Miss you Fred ... Happy Birthday.
    Here in VT we wear sweaters til June.
    "Every body's fancy, every body's fine, your body's fancy and so is mine."

    Posted by Carla F. March 20, 08 08:38 AM
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  1. Mr. Rogers was my first friend in this country. I watched him every day from when I was seven years old. I came her in January 1970 from Jamaica to New York. He was so comforting in a strange new place. He never laughed at my accent. I loved that guy and still do. When he died I remember being so devastated. I still miss him. I don't have a sweater to put on today but I'm wearing one in my heart for Mr. Rogers, my first friend in America.

    Posted by chris March 20, 08 12:16 PM
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  1. This 37-year-old grew up watching Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. When I graduated from Boston University in 1992, Fred Rogers was on hand to deliver the opening prayer at the big graduation ceremony on Nickerson Field. When he stood, the entire graduating class rose to their feet and cheered. When we all finally simmered down, Mister Rogers - who was grinning from ear to ear - asked us, "Would you all like to sing along?" Again we cheered - and then we sang "It's A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood" with our hero.

    I wore my zip-up cardigan today in honor of Fred Rogers' countless hours of wonderful, gentle lessons.

    Posted by Martha Crannell March 20, 08 06:15 PM
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  1. Mister Roger's was my role model as I parented four children. He also, without knowing, reparented me, as I concurrently changed my world through the mantra that we are loved just the way we are. My children and I have so many memories of watching and learning from Mister Rogers and his Neighborhood friends. To this day we make comparisons and analogies based on those experiences. I saw his sweater in the Smithsonian, it was my favorite item of interest there.
    He lives on in my daily perspective, he changed my world. All that's left is to carry on....

    Posted by Sally May March 31, 08 12:24 PM
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Katie Johnston Chase likes dive bars, old country music, and pop art that has something to say.
Meredith Goldstein is keen on DJs who spin pop music and restaurants that serve real food after 11 p.m.
Emily Sweeney is a lifelong Bostonian who goes out all over, from Irish pubs in Southie to the roller rink in Dorchester.
Jeff Miranda has never heard a '90s alternative-rock jam that's not already a mainstay on his iPod.
Joan Charlotte Matelli digs movie singalongs, well-made cocktails, and alt-country rockers.
Courtney Hollands is a shopaholic and a music junkie with a penchant for tapas, chai, and Hall & Oates dance parties.
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