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Lady Antebellum performs free at Wis. gas station

FILE - In this June 10, 2010 file photo, Lady Antebellum performs during the CMA Music Festival at LP Field in Nashville, Tenn. More than 1,000 people showed up in suburban Milwaukee to help Lady Antebellum relive its 'worst gig ever.' The country trio played their hit song 'Need You Now' on Thursday, Oct. 21, 2010, along with two other songs. FILE - In this June 10, 2010 file photo, Lady Antebellum performs during the CMA Music Festival at LP Field in Nashville, Tenn. More than 1,000 people showed up in suburban Milwaukee to help Lady Antebellum relive its "worst gig ever." The country trio played their hit song "Need You Now" on Thursday, Oct. 21, 2010, along with two other songs. (AP Photo/Wade Payne, file)
By Carrie Antlfinger
Associated Press Writer / October 21, 2010

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RICHFIELD, Wis.—More than 1,000 people showed up at a rural gas station Thursday to help Lady Antebellum relive their "worst gig ever."

The country trio played their hit song "Need You Now" along with two others during a free concert outside the Mayfield Mobil station in suburban Milwaukee.

"This is definitely one of those things we will remember," said singer Charles Kelley after the show.

"Forever," added singer Hillary Scott.

On the opening day of Wisconsin's deer hunting season in 2007, the fledgling group performed at a nearby truck stop-diner at 5:30 a.m. About 15 people were eating breakfast when they showed up with a local country radio station, WMIL.

In February of this year, when a magazine asked the now multiplatinum-selling band to describe its worst gig ever, Kelley reached back to that moment.

"It was at the butt-crack of dawn to kick off hunting season," Kelley answered. "Everybody was sitting there eating. They didn't know who the hell we were."

On Thursday, Kelley said his comments were taken out of context because he also said they had a lot of fun.

After Thursday's performance, Lady Antebellum took several audience questions. A woman asked if fame had changed them.

"We hate people," Kelley joked, drawing laughter from the crowd.

"My heels have definitely gotten higher," Scott said.

She later added: "The three of us being in a band together, there's very much a grounding effect. We don't let any of us get the big heads."

Laurie Perry, 45, and Julie Aumann, 47, both of nearby Hartford, said they were among the original 15 or so people at the first appearance.

"I remember them sitting at the table and Charles was a very nice guy and came up and shook our hand," Perry said. "I didn't really know who they were. They were singing up at the counter a little bit and I thought, 'These guys are pretty good.'"

They are big fans now.

"I feel like now we are their original supporters so we came back, we're loyal and we love them," Perry said.

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