THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Pop Music

The irresistible, singable, stick-in-your-mindable jingle is dead

With more and more pop songs selling products, the world of advertising is being turned upside down.

By Joan Anderman
Globe Staff / January 9, 2005

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

In 1929, a barbershop quartet in Minneapolis sang a song about breakfast cereal on the radio. So began the long, lucrative, endearing, and excruciating heyday of the jingle, when cheerful tunes about things for sale permanently lodged themselves in people's brains. Humming consumers would then go out and buy Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco treat, or double their pleasure with Doublemint ... (Full article: 1570 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass