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Movie Stars

Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper in “Limitless.’’ Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper in “Limitless.’’ (John Baer/Relativity Media)
March 25, 2011

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Previously released Jane Eyre Cary Joji Fukunaga’s quietly confident film dramatizes Charlotte Brontë’s classic gothic romance from the inside out. Emotions repressed and set free drive the narrative; and what the movie loses in epic resonance it gains in inner strength. Mia Wasikowska makes an appealingly flinty Jane, and Michael Fassbender a rough-hewn Rochester. (120 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)

Kill the Irishman An Irish-American gangster (Ray Stevenson) runs afoul of the Cleveland mob, circa 1975, and boy, does it ever run afoul of him. Based on a true story, the movie is more enjoyable than it has any right to be. Stevenson is solid, if too old for the part. A proudly hammy supporting cast includes mobster Vincent D’Onofrio (very good), cop Val Kilmer (not so very good), and numbers kingpin Christopher Walken (borderline sublime). (106 min., R) (Mark Feeney)

Limitless As much as he seems like bootleg Matthew McConaughey, Bradley Cooper might be more interesting than that. He plays a writer who starts taking a smart drug. This is basically a messy addiction thriller in which the jones is for the acquisition and execution of knowledge. So you need an actor who seems surprised by how smart he is but not afraid to be charmingly intelligent. Cooper turns out to be perfect for the part. With Abbie Cornish and Robert De Niro. (93 min., PG-13) (Wesley Morris)

Of Gods and Men This 2010 Cannes prizewinner dramatizes the fate of a group of Trappist monks during the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. What could have been a foursquare tale of martyrdom is something weirder and much richer: an experience that takes us right up to the edge of human experience and peers into the unknown. In French and Arabic, with subtitles (122 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)

Phil Ochs: There but for Fortune A clear-eyed memorial to the late folk singer, whose mixture of ambition and idealism ensured he wouldn’t get out of the counterculture years alive. Kenneth Bowser’s documentary captures the highs and lows of Ochs’s life but stops short of larger observations, one of which is that audiences are always drawn more to mystery (Dylan) than commitment (Ochs). (97 min., unrated) (Ty Burr)

Tornado Alley This latest IMAX spectacular follows a team of scientists and their fleet of radar vehicles as they plumb the “unseen architecture’’ of tornadoes. Meanwhile, Sean Casey (“Storm Chasers’’) races his armored vehicle to get the footage. Awe-inspiring, doom-slinging, fluffy fun, if not troubling. Given tsunamis and other disasters, can we just sit back and take pleasure in the chase? (43 min., unrated) (Ethan Gilsdorf)

An archive of movie reviews can be found at www.boston.com/movies. Theaters are subject to change.

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