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A new way of thinking about social networks and the world

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/file 2007 Nicholas A. Christakis (pictured) and James H. Fowler argue that our brains evolved so we could form social networks.
Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/file 2007
Nicholas A. Christakis (pictured) and James H. Fowler argue that our brains evolved so we could form social networks. (Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/File 2007)
By Michael Fitzgerald
Globe Correspondent / March 9, 2010

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Our social networks and where we sit in them set the course for much of what happens in our lives, say Nicholas A. Christakis, a doctor and sociology professor at Harvard, and James H. Fowler, a political scientist at the University of California-San Diego. (Full article: 686 words)

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