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A mothers' son

Three women nurtured Faulkner's imagination, leaving indelible marks on his art

By Alexander Theroux
April 5, 2009

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Southern gentlemen at one time knew better than to be artists. By becoming a novelist, William Faulkner crossed a cultural divide into what were considered feminine pursuits. He wrote his editor Malcolm Cowley in 1946 that " 'art' was really no manly business. It was the polite painting of china by gentlewomen." Faulkner, who went on to take the step, ... (Full article: 988 words)

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